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Why you should consider HomeSchooling
> Homeschooling is the best way to teach your children your beliefs and protect them from harmful teachings
> Homeschooled kids are very well educated and have become the most sought after by all major Colleges
> An estimated 2 million children were Homeschooled in 2006, saving taxpayers $10 billion dollars
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Interesting Articles
St. Cloud Times: Home-school cooperatives help support area kids, parents
Mom and Dad Are Better Than Certified Teachers
Fascinating Facts About Homeschool vs Public School
Nationwide Study Confirms Homeschool Academic Achievement
Socialization: Homeschooling vs. Schools
Why Christians don't belong in government schools
Charter Schools: Look Before You Leap!
Avoid Government Homeschooling Like the Plague
How do you Build a Homeschool Curriculum that best suits your child?
Great Homeschooling Books
The Organized Homeschooler

A veteran educator has compiled her most-requested homeschooling workshop material so that families can become more proficient in educating their kids. Covering issues like time management, space usage and materials, Vicki Caruana addresses a variety of organizational needs to help families structure not only their work areas, but also their thinking, their paperwork--and each other!

Catholic Education: Homeward Bound

This is an wonderful, well-written, informative book. It is a superb resource and it answers all questions of potential homeschoolers. Kimberly Hahn and Mary Hassen do a great job of not only emphasizing the importance of educating our children, but also how to incorporate our faith into educating our children.

Family Matters: Why Homeschooling Makes Sense

Guterson mounts a strong challenge to "the doctrine of school's necessity." He profiles the home-school movement, which encompasses more than 300,000 families in America, and probes the wide variety of motives behind its growth. The most common, he finds, is parents' dissatisfaction with the mass, prescribed and other-directed nature of public education. Guterson argues that properly practiced home-schooling produces academic success, lessens peer pressure and allows children to become independent.